Rachel Cohen

Rachel Cohen has written essays for The New Yorker, The Guardian, The London Review of Books, The New York Times, The Nation, The Threepenny Review, The Believer, McSweeney's and other publications, and her essays have been anthologized in Best American Essays and in the Pushcart Prize Anthology. Her first book, A Chance Meeting: Intertwined Lives of American Writers and Artists (Random House, 2004), is a series of thirty-six linked essays about the encounters among thirty figures in American history during the long century from the civil war through the civil rights movement; it won the PEN/Jerard Fund Award, was a finalist for the Guardian First Book Prize and the PEN/Martha Albrand Award, and was named a notable book of the year by the Los Angeles Times and by Maureen Corrigan on National Public Radio. Cohen's second book, Bernard Berenson: A Life in the Picture Trade (Yale University Press, 2013), is a consideration of biography that investigates the development of a great art connoisseur who began life as a penniless Lithuanian immigrant and made his career in the world of Gilded Age finance and prejudice. It was longlisted for the JQ Wingate prize and chosen a highly recommended book by the Boston Authors Club. Cohen has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She is currently a Guggenheim fellow in nonfiction; her project is to consider, by looking at painting, changing experiences we have had of time over the last two hundred years. The book is tentatively called Time in Pieces: Painting Modern Life. Cohen is a tenured member of the regular faculty of the creative nonfiction program at Sarah Lawrence College, and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

Website

Photo by Peter Serling

Photo by Peter Serling