Oct
16
6:00pm 6:00pm

Canon / Archive : Franco Moretti in Conversation with Leah Price and Nicholas Dames

C3_P6_3.9.jpg

The New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU

n+1 Magazine

and

the Institute for Public Knowledge present:

 

Canon/Archive:

 

Franco Moretti in Conversation

with Leah Price

and Nicholas Dames

moderated by Virginia Heffernan

 

On Computer-Aided Criticism

& the Stanford Literary Lab

and Beyond

 

Franco Moretti is Permanent Fellow, Wissenschaftskolleg Zu Berlin

Leah Price is Francis Lee Higginson Professor of English Literature at Harvard

Nicholas Dames is Theodore Kahan Professor of Humanities at Columbia

Virginia Heffernan is a Contributing Editor at Politico and the author of Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art

 

View Event →
Uneasy Street : The Anxieties of Affluence
Oct
4
6:00pm 6:00pm

Uneasy Street : The Anxieties of Affluence

NYU’s Institute for Public Knowledge and the NYIH at NYU invite you to join us for a launch event for Rachel Sherman’s new book Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence (Princeton University Press, 2017). Sherman will be present in conversation with Ron Lieber.

From TV’s “real housewives” to The Wolf of Wall Street, our popular culture portrays the wealthy as materialistic and entitled. But what do we really know about those who live on “easy street”? In this penetrating book, Rachel Sherman draws on rare in-depth interviews that she conducted with fifty affluent New Yorkers—including hedge fund financiers and corporate lawyers, professors and artists, and stay-at-home mothers—to examine their lifestyle choices and their understanding of privilege. Sherman upends images of wealthy people as invested only in accruing and displaying social advantages for themselves and their children. Instead, these liberal elites, who believe in diversity and meritocracy, feel conflicted about their position in a highly unequal society. They wish to be “normal,” describing their consumption as reasonable and basic and comparing themselves to those who have more than they do rather than those with less. These New Yorkers also want to see themselves as hard workers who give back and raise children with good values, and they avoid talking about money.

Although their experiences differ depending on a range of factors, including whether their wealth was earned or inherited, these elites generally depict themselves as productive and prudent, and therefore morally worthy, while the undeserving rich are lazy, ostentatious, and snobbish. Sherman argues that this ethical distinction between “good” and “bad” wealthy people characterizes American culture more broadly, and that it perpetuates rather than challenges economic inequality.

As the distance between rich and poor widens, Uneasy Street not only explores the real lives of those at the top but also sheds light on how extreme inequality comes to seem ordinary and acceptable to the rest of us.

Rachel Sherman is associate professor of sociology at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College. Her first book, Class Acts: Service and Inequality in Luxury Hotels (University of California Press, 2007), analyzes how workers, guests, and managers in luxury hotels make sense of and negotiate class inequalities that marked their relationships.

Ron Lieber is a journalist and author of the “Your Money” column for The New York Times, which addresses a variety of personal finance issues, from investing to paying for college to mortgages and homes. He is also the author of The Opposite of Spoiled, a guide to teaching kids about money and values.

View Event →
The Second Annual PUP/NYIH Lecture in the Humanities: Annette Gordon-Reed on Thomas Jefferson’s Imagined Black Nation
Apr
20
6:30pm 6:30pm

The Second Annual PUP/NYIH Lecture in the Humanities: Annette Gordon-Reed on Thomas Jefferson’s Imagined Black Nation

Princeton University Press and the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University are pleased to announce the second the Second Annual PUP/NYIH Lecture in the Humanities. With the aim of highlighting both the value and the relevance of the humanities, this new lecture will be given annually in New York by notable figures from a wide range of fields and will explore humanistic topics and themes.

This year's lecture will be given by Annette Gordon-Reed, who is the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School and a professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. Gordon-Reed won the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2009 for The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (W.W. Norton, 2009). Her most recently published book (with Peter S. Onuf) is “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination (Liveright Publishing, 2016). Gordon-Reed's lecture, "Thomas Jefferson’s Imagined Black Nation," draws on her research from this book. Thomas Jefferson had a vision of enslaved African Americans as a "captive nation," a nation that could not coexist peacefully with the American nation. How did Jefferson come to this view? What are we to make of him in light of his pessimism about the possibility of a multiracial, multicultural society?

View Event →
Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus, A Conversation with Laura Kipnis and Shamus Khan
Apr
19
6:30pm 6:30pm

Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus, A Conversation with Laura Kipnis and Shamus Khan

Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus is Laura Kipnis's provocative argument for how the “recent upheavals in sexual culture on American campuses” are symptomatic of “officially sanctioned” sexual paranoia and hysteria. She will be joined in conversation by the cultural critical Shamus Khan, of Columbia University.

Laura Kipnis is a cultural critic/essayist whose work focuses on sexual politics, emotion, acting out, bad behavior, and various other crevices of the American psyche. She is the author of MEN: Notes from an Ongoing Investigation (November 2014/ Metropolitan), and her latest book is Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus; her previous books, which include How To Become a Scandal and Against Love, have been translated into over fifteen languages. She teaches in the filmmaking program at Northwestern University.

Shamus Khan is associate professor of sociology at Columbia University, where he is the director of the graduate program. He is also an editor at Public Culture and writes on culture, inequality, and elites.

This event was co-sponsored by the Institute for Public Knowledge and Public Books.

**for an audio recording of this event, please go to our Audio Archives in the main navigation bar of the NYIH home page.

View Event →
Consciousness and the Art of Illusion
Oct
23
6:30pm 6:30pm

Consciousness and the Art of Illusion

Deutsches Haus at NYU and the New York Institute of the Humanities at NYU present a conversation between novelist Daniel Kehlmann and magician Mark Mitton on "Consciousness and the Art of Illusion." Kehlmann and Mitton, who is a working magician and an expert on physical misdirection, will discuss illusion in literature and magic.

View Event →
Michel Houellebecq's Submission
Oct
22
7:00pm 7:00pm

Michel Houellebecq's Submission


Please join the New York Institute for the Humanities for a discussion of Michel Houellebecq's novel Submission with translator Lorin Stein, Emily Apter, Eric Banks, Tom Bishop, and Adam Shatz.

 

Participants

Emily Apter, NYU
Eric Banks, New York Institute for the Humanities
Tom Bishop, NYU
Adam Shatz, London Review of Books
Lorin Stein, The Paris Review

 

Free and open to the public with RSVP.

View Event →
Nixon and Kissinger
Sep
30
6:00pm 6:00pm

Nixon and Kissinger

  • New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
hero-slider-nixon-kissinger.jpg

Award-winning authors Tim Weiner and Greg Grandin will discuss their new books on two of America's most controversial public figures. Weiner's One Man Against the World and Grandin's Kissinger's Shadow examine the ongoing legacy of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger. The authors will discuss how Nixon's and Kissinger's actions and policies led first to the collapse of America's Cold War national security warfare state and then its restoration in new form, a restored imperial presidency (based on evermore spectacular displays of violence, more intense secrecy, and an increasing use of war and militarism to leverage domestic dissent and polarization for political advantage) capable of moving forward into a post-Vietnam world. The event will be moderated by Professor Marilyn Young and is cosponsored by the NYU Center for the Humanities.


About the Participants

 

GREG GRANDIN is professor of history at NYU and is the author of a number of prize-winning books, including The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World, which won the Bancroft Prize in American History and was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize in the UK. His book Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History, as well as for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Grandin has contributed to The New York TimesHarper’sThe London Review of BooksThe NationThe Boston ReviewThe Los Angeles Times, and The American Historical Review. His latest book, Kissinger’s Shadow, was published in August.

TIM WEINER is the author of five books. Legacy of Ashes, his history of the CIA, won the National Book Award. His journalism on secret government programs received the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. As a correspondent for The New York Times, he covered war and terrorism in Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Sudan, and other nations. He directs the Carey Institute's nonfiction residency program in upstate New York and teaches as an Anschutz Distinguished Fellow in American Studies at Princeton. His most recent book, One Man Against the World: The Tragedy of Richard Nixon, was published this spring.

MARILYN YOUNG is one of the most eminent authorities on the history of American foreign relations and the war in Vietnam. A professor of history at NYU, she is the author of numerous award-winning books on the history of the conflict, including, most notably, The Vietnam Wars: 1945–1990.

View Event →